3D Flyover Video of PennEast Pipeline Route in vicinity of the Route Start (MP 6 to MP 0)

This is part 14 of the 3D flyover video series of the PennEast routes. In this installment, we look at the route where it starts in Luzerne County, PA, at mile posts 6 to 0.

As always, the 400′ survey corridor is in smokey gray, the pipeline 50′ permanent easement line is in red, and the light blue areas are temporary construction zones. There is also a 100′ construction right of way not shown here.

 I have also begun organizing these videos, they are all available under the “3D Flyover Videos” top navigation area.
I estimate there is about half a mile of co-location along this section of the route, effectively the interconnects at the the very start.  The rest is routed all through rugged hilly terrain and old-growth forests.
At 1:32 it starts to reach the top of a ridge, and then starts a long, steep descent down the hill side.
We need to wake up PA officials and show them the lie of “co-location” in their towns and counties.

3D Flyover video of proposed PennEast Pipeline Route near Wilkes-Barre PA

This is part of the 3D flyover video series of the PennEast routes. In this installment, we look at the route in the Wilkes-Barre, PA vicinity, specifically around mile markers 13 to 6.

As always, the 400′ survey corridor is in smokey gray, the pipeline 50′ permanent easement line is in red, and the light blue areas are temporary construction zones. There is also a 100′ construction right of way not shown here.

This portion of the route is packed with all sorts of horrifying impacts.
We start right off the bat with incredibly steep slopes near mile marker 13.  The pipeline route climbs straight up a slope through old growth forest.
At 0:43 into the video, we see yet another example of how the route has almost no co-location at all.  The route goes right through some more old growth forest.
At 1:47 it clips the west side of a quarry operation, at 2:06 they go through ANOTHER QUARRY.  All these quarries involve regular blasting and PennEast isn’t “near” them.  It. Is. Going. Through. Them.
At 2:28 we see the route heading into town.  Dozens of residential houses are within 200′ or less of the construction zones.  At 2:37 we see a baseball diamond with home plate about 400′ from the center line.
At 3:00 we see one of the most heart breaking and dangerous aspects of the PennEast proposal.  The Susquehanna River crossing.  PennEast originally planned to bore under the river, until it finally heard the cacophony of everyone in the region screaming at them that the Susquehanna river bottom is unstable mud and gunk that’s hundreds of feet deep and filled with carcinogens from mining operations.
So the brilliant minds at PennEast decided to open trench it instead.  At 3:10 you can see that the crossing point involves an island in the middle of the river.  PennEast’s plan is to damn up one side of the island, open trench through the gunk and mud and lay the pipe down.  Push the gunk and mud back on top.  And then just open up their dam and let all that pollute material wash down stream.
THEN THEY DO IT AGAIN ON THE OTHER SIDE.
All of this is just a couple of miles down stream from the infamous Knox Mine Disaster.  PennEast hasn’t the slightest clue what’s really here and what impacts their open trenching will have.  But history tells us there are substantial risks here.
The video closes out with PennEast routing within 400′ of another baseball diamond for good measure.

3D Flyover of PennEast Pipeline Route in vicinity of Kidder, PA (MP 21 to MP 26)

This is part of the 3D flyover video series of the PennEast routes. In this installment, we look at the route in the Kidder, PA vicinity, specifically around mile marker 21 to 26.

As always, the 400′ survey corridor is in smokey gray, the pipeline 50′ permanent easement line is in red, and the light blue areas are temporary construction zones. There is also a 100′ construction right of way not shown here.

The video starts at route 940, with the remainder of this portion all going through forested lands.  We see another example of PennEast-style “co-location” here – the pipeline route parallel with, but not within, another right of way.  So PennEast is more than doubling the existing cut.

At 1:27 we climb up a small hill, and soon plunge down into the second crossing of the Lehigh River.  This one does not show as an HDD or bore under, but instead a straight trenching through the river.    I need to confirm this against the construction plans.

 

Oh my God Becky, look at that bluff

This is part XI (!) of the 3D Flyover video series of the proposed PennEast Pipeline route.

This one is a look at another one of the Important Bird Area (IBA) Avoidance Routes, specifically the one that avoids the Holland/Milford area in NJ and instead routes through Bucks County.

The potential route is in transparent red, we fly a few hundred meters above it.  The route is shown in a 350′ wide zone of uncertainty, given the coarse natures of the maps provided by PennEast.

The video starts at the Delaware River and heads North.  So at the very beginning we go straight up a very steep climb, then continues going up and down some modest hills.  It then heads out through old growth forests, paralleling a narrow power line cut.

After a long path through forests, it gets dramatic around 2:10.  There the route goes right to the very edge of the Delaware River bluffs on the PA side.   Just before turning left you can see the Gilbert generating plant across the river in NJ and the Gilbert interconnect route to get to it.

The route then teeters on the very edge of the bluffs, like the Man in Black peering down from the Cliffs of Insanity.

After the bluffs, it dives into PA heading out through farm country.

It terminates at the interconnect at Route 78.

As with all of the IBA Avoidance alternatives, the routing choices are just nuts.  It’s clear that PennEast put nearly zero effort into the routing.

3D Flyover of proposed PennEast Pipeline Route in Delaware township vicinity

This is part of the 3D flyover video series of the PennEast routes. In this installment, we look at the route in the Delaware Township vicinity.

As always, the 400′ survey corridor is in smokey gray, the pipeline 50′ permanent easement line is in red, and the light blue areas are temporary construction zones. There is also a 100′ construction right of way not shown here.

This starts with another long HDD stretch.  At 0:21 in the video you can see an HDD prep site right at the front door of my friend Carla’s place.  Incidentally, PennEast has not indicated how homeowners in situations such as Carla will have ingress/egress to their homes with both trenching across their driveways plus massive heavy construction equipment on site.
There are many big HDD stretches here, including those at Lower Creek Road and Brookville Hollow Road.
The route continues of course through the Rosemont Historical Agricultural District.

3D Flyover of the proposed PennEast Pipeline Route in Kingwood Township vicinity

This is part of the 3D flyover video series of the PennEast routes. In this installment, we look at the route in the Kingwood Township vicinity.

As always, the 400′ survey corridor is in smokey gray, the pipeline 50′ permanent easement line is in red, and the light blue areas are temporary construction zones. There is also a 100′ construction right of way not shown here.

More agricultural and woodland impacts, plus the first of the incredibly long HDD sites.   If the northernmost Kingwood HDD attempt fails, PennEast will have to either make a major re-route or destroy the major solar panel installation we see at 1:45.